Microsoft PowerShell Lifecycle: End Of Life And Support Status

Last updated on February 19, 2024

Microsoft PowerShell, or Windows PowerShell, is a command-line shell that is cross-platform and built on .NET. It is an automation tool primarily used by developers and sysadmins for configuration and automation. It is normally used to deal with structured data.

PowerShell comes preinstalled in all Windows versions. However, different versions may be installed according to the availability and support.

Support status guide

End of life (EOL) is the end of a product’s useful life. When a product reaches the end of its life cycle, the manufacturer no longer supports it. The following table explains the different phases of a product’s lifecycle. Testing status is when the product is initially released and EOL is when product support is no longer offered. The time between these two points is the support timeframe.

Testing

The software is not yet publicly available. It is in testing phase i.e., alpha, beta, release preview etc.

Active

The software is actively supported by the vendor.

Phasing Out

The software will soon reach its end of life. You need to look for upgrade or migration options. The software will automatically go into phasing out status 2 months before end of life.

End Of Life

The software is no longer supported by the vendor. You need to make sure your system and environment are safe.

Version

Released

Active Support

PowerShell 7.4 (LTS)
5 months and 3 days ago
(16 November 2023)
Ends in 1 year and 3 weeks
(15 May 2025)
PowerShell 7.3
1 year and 5 months ago
(8 November 2022)
Ends in 2 weeks and 4 days
(8 May 2024)
PowerShell 7.2 (LTS)
2 years and 5 months ago
(5 November 2021)
Ends in 7 months and 1 week
(30 November 2024)
PowerShell 7.1
3 years and 5 months ago
(11 November 2020)
Ended 1 year and 10 months ago
(31 May 2022)
PowerShell 7.0 (LTS)
4 years and 1 month ago
(3 March 2020)
Ended 1 year and 4 months ago
(3 December 2022)
PowerShell 6.2
5 years and 3 weeks ago
(28 March 2019)
Ended 3 years and 7 months ago
(4 September 2020)
PowerShell 6.1
6 years and 3 months ago
(13 January 2018)
Ended 4 years and 6 months ago
(28 September 2019)
PowerShell 6.0
6 years and 3 months ago
(10 January 2018)
Ended 5 years and 2 months ago
(13 February 2019)
PowerShell 5.1
7 years and 8 months ago
(2 August 2016)
Ends in 2 years and 8 months
(12 January 2027)
PowerShell 5.0
8 years and 1 month ago
(24 February 2016)
Ended 7 years and 8 months ago
(2 August 2016)
PowerShell 4.0
10 years and 6 months ago
(1 October 2013)
Ended 6 months and 1 week ago
(10 October 2023)
PowerShell 3.0
11 years and 6 months ago
(1 October 2012)
Ended 6 months and 1 week ago
(10 October 2023)
PowerShell 2.0
14 years and 9 months ago
(1 July 2009)
Ended 4 years and 3 months ago
(14 January 2020)
PowerShell 1.0
17 years and 5 months ago
(14 November 2006)
Ended 4 years and 3 months ago
(14 January 2020)

Microsoft PowerShell uses the Modern Lifecycle Policy, which essentially means that it will continuously be supported provided that the requirements are met.

PowerShell is supported as a current release and an LTS release, where the latter started rolling out after the release of PowerShell 7.0 (LTS). After that, all even-numbered minor releases were LTS versions.

The LTS release of PowerShell is built on an LTS release of .NET. Updates to the LTS release only contain critical security updates and servicing fixes that are designed to minimize impact on existing workloads. Since PowerShell is based on .NET, each LTS version is only supported as long as its .NET version is supported.

On the other hand, current releases can contain critical fixes, innovations, and new features. A current release is supported for six months after the next release (current or LTS).