KB4601382: Cumulative Update For Windows 10 20H2 And 2004

  • Microsoft released non-security Windows 10 cumulative update KB4601382 for versions 2004 and 20H2.
  • This release is a Servicing Stack Update – Updates Windows update channels.
  • A plethora of improvements and fixes.
Thumbnail
Microsoft Releases Servicing Stack Update for Windows 10

Microsoft has just released a Servicing Stack Update: KB4601382. This is a rare type of update to come across as it is not scheduled and aims to improve the Windows’ update channel. This is an optional update that requires it to be manually installed on your Windows 10 device.

This update was released for both Windows 10 versions 2004 and 20H2. Its primary focus is to service the update channel to ensure users keep receiving new updates free of hassle. Installing this update will upgrade your builds to 19041.844 for v2004 and 19042.844 for v20H2.

Also see:

KB4601382 for Insider Preview Beta Channel

KB4601382 for Insider Preview Dev Channel

Visit this page to learn more about Microsoft Insider programs.

Let’s dig into what this update brings to Windows and how you can install it on your PC.

What’s new in KB4601382

Since both v2004 and 20H2 have the same core backbone, most of the new features apply to them both. Let’s discuss these in detail.

Servicing Stack Update

As we mentioned earlier, this is a Servicing Stack Update. Servicing stack refers to the component that installs Windows updates. Maintaining it ensures that Windows 10 users have a reliable and robust stream of updates.

Highlights

Here is a list of all the significant changes and improvements this update brings to your OS:\

  • Addresses an issue with Windows Out of Box Experience (OOBE) which displays unexpected screens.
  • Addresses an issue in the Advanced display settings in the Settings app that showed incorrect refresh rates for High Dynamic Range (HDR) displays.
  • A problem that resulted in playback video flickering when rendering on certain low-latency monitors has been addressed.
  • An issue that occasionally prevents string input in Input Method Editor (IME) has been fixed.
  • Updates a problem that sometimes prevents some keyboard keys, such as Home, Ctrl, etc., from working.
  • Addresses a problem that displays the wrong language when signing into a console after changing the system locale.
  • The problem with screen rendering after opening games with specific hardware configurations has been fixed.
  • The Envelop media type will now be displayed as a proper, selectable output paper type for Universal Print queues.
  • Support for hole punch and stapling locations has been incorporated for print jobs.

Improvements and fixes

As mentioned, these improvements and fixes apply to both versions of Windows 10:

  • The problem of memory leak in Internet Explorer 11 while using the Chinese language pack has been addressed.
  • An issue with some COM+ callout policies that may cause a deadlock in some applications has been fixed.
  • An issue that prevented some Win32 applications from running as a different user when using the “Run as” option has been addressed.
  • Addresses an issue with Windows Out of Box Experience (OOBE) which displays unexpected screens.
  • An issue resulting in a deadlock when a COM server delivers an event to multiple subscribers has been taken care of.
  • Addresses an issue in the Advanced display settings in the Settings app that shows incorrect refresh rates for High Dynamic Range (HDR) displays.
  • An issue preventing some CAD applications from launching if they were relying on OpenGL has been fixed.
  • The problem that resulted in playback video flickering when rendering on certain low-latency monitors has been addressed.
  • An issue that occasionally prevents string input in Input Method Editor (IME) has been fixed.
  • The issue of unnecessary resource exhaustion because Desktop Windows Manager (DWM) leaks handles and virtual memory in RDP sessions has been catered to.
  • A stop error on startup has been mitigated.
  • Addresses an issue that may delay a Windows Hello for Business (WHfB) Certificate Trust deployment when opening the Settings-> Accounts-> Sign-in Options page.
  • Updates a problem that sometimes prevents some keyboard keys, such as Home, Ctrl, etc., from working in Japanese IME mode in Kana.
  • The history of previously used pictures from a user account has been removed.
  • Addresses a problem that displays the wrong language when signing into a console after changing the system locale.
  • An issue that causes the host process of Windows Remote Management (WinRM) to stop working when messages from the PowerShell plugin are formatted has been addressed.
  • The issue of a heap leak when the security settings are applied to Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) namespace permissions has been fixed.
  • A problem with screen rendering after opening games with specific hardware configurations has been fixed.
  • The startup times for applications having roaming settings when User Experience Virtualization (UE-V) is enabled have been improved.
  • An issue in which a principal in a trusted MIT realm fails to obtain a Kerberos service ticket from Active Directory domain controllers (DC) has been addressed.
  • High CPU utilization by Microsoft Defender for Endpoint has been addressed.
  • Data loss prevention and insider risk management solution functionalities have been enhanced in Microsoft 365 endpoints.
  • An error displayed when attempting to access an untrusted webpage using Microsoft Edge or an untrusted Microsoft Office document has been mitigated.
  • An issue that prevents wevtutil from parsing an XML file has been fixed.
  • Addresses an issue that fails to report an error when the Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (ECDSA) generates invalid keys of 163 bytes instead of 165 bytes.
  • Support for using the new Chromium-based Microsoft Edge as an assigned access kiosk app has been added.
  • Addresses an issue with User Datagram Protocol (UDP) broadcast packets that are larger than the maximum transmission unit (MTU).
  • An issue in which the WinHTTP AutoProxy service does not comply with the value set for the maximum Time To Live (TTL) on the Proxy Auto-Configuration (PAC) file has been addressed.
  • The Envelop media type will now be displayed as a proper, selectable output paper type for Universal Print queues.
  • When using Microsoft Internet Printing Protocol (IPP) Class Driver, a random paper size will no longer be displayed.
  • Enables Windows to retrieve updated printer capabilities to ensure that users have the proper set of selectable print options.
  • Support for hole punch and stapling locations has been incorporated for print jobs.
  • An issue that might cause the IKEEXT service to stop working has been addressed.
  • An issue that may prevent a Non-Volatile Memory Express (NVMe) device from entering the proper power state has been fixed.
  • A problem that may cause stop error 7E in nfssvr.sys on servers running the Network File System (NFS) service has been addressed.
  • An issue that prevents the User Profile Service from detecting a slow or a fast link has been catered to.
  • An issue that causes contention for a metadata lock when using Work Folders has been fixed.
  • A new Key has been added to system registries with the following information:
    • Path: HKEY_Local_Machine -> Software -> Microsoft -> dfslog.
    • DWORD (32-bit) Value: RootShareAcquireSuccessEvent
      • Default value = 1 -> enables log.
      • Value other than 1 -> disables log.
  • A check-in reason for requests from the client to the server has been added to the Open Mobile Alliance (OMA) Device Management (DM) sync protocol.
  • Token binding has been turned off by default in Windows Internet (WinINet). 
  • An issue with failover in an environment that only has IPv6 clusters has been addressed.

Apart from these, another improvement to Windows 10 v20H2 has been made: This update improves the ability of WInHTTP Web Proxy Auto-Discovery (WPAD) Service to ignore invalid WPAD URLs that the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server returns.

Known issues

As with any update, here are KB4601382’s known issues:

  • Some system and user certificates might be lost when updating a device from Windows 10 v1809 or later to a later build of the OS. However, Microsoft states that devices using Windows Update for Business or directly connected to Windows Update are not impacted. If you are impacted by this, Microsoft suggests that you rollback to the previous version of the operating system using the steps provided in the article down below.
  • Users might experience not getting the correct Furigana characters when using the Microsoft Japanese Input Method Editor (IME) to enter Kanji characters within an application that automatically allows the input of Furigana characters. Right now, Microsoft does not have a workaround for this.

Note that these specific issues have been known for quite some time, but Microsoft has not been able to solve them so far.

Download Windows update KB4601382

Install KB4601382 using Windows Update

Since this is an Optional Update, it will need to be installed manually.

To install this update using Windows Update, please go to Start Menu –> Settings –> Update & Security –> Windows Update. In the right-hand pane, click on the Check for updates button. You will then be able to see the update. Click Download and install under it and it should begin downloading.

download and install 2

Download offline installers for KB4601382

These updates can also be installed on any computer that has the relevant version of Windows 10, without having an internet connection. Download the offline installers below as per your Windows 10 version and platform requirements:

For Windows 10 Version 20H2

Download KB4601382 for Windows 10 Version 20H2 64-Bit [440.2 MB]

Download KB4601382 for Windows 10 Version 20H2 32-Bit [152 MB]

For Windows 10 Version 2004

Download KB4601382 for Windows 10 Version 2004 64-Bit [440.2 MB]

Download KB4601382 for Windows 10 Version 2004 32-Bit [152 MB]

To download any other updates related to any of the above, please check the Microsoft Catalog.

To install the update, simply run the downloaded MSU file and Windows will automatically install the cumulative update.

Uninstall Windows cumulative updates

If you face any issues with this update, here is a quick guide on how you can uninstall the update on your computer.

Uninstall updates using Windows Update History tool

  1. Navigate to the following:
    Start Menu ->Settings –> Update & Security –> Windows Update.
  2. From the right-hand pane, click on View Update History.
  3. Now click on Uninstall updates.
  4. Select Update for Microsoft Windows with the relevant update name and press the Uninstall button.

Uninstall update using command-line

You can also delete the update by entering several commands in the Command Prompt. Here is how:

  1. Open Command Prompt (Run –> cmd)
  2. Run the following command:
    wmic qfe list brief /format:table
  3. This will show all the updates installed on the computer. Make sure the relevant updates are on the list.
  4. To uninstall the update, run the following command
    wusa /uninstall /kb:UpdateName
    Replace UpdateName with the number from the update. For example, if the update that you want to uninstall is KB4601382, you will enter the following command:
    wusa /uninstall /kb:4601382

Restart your computer once the update is removed.

Cleanup after installing Windows Updates

If you want to save space after installing Windows updates, you can run the following commands:

dism.exe /Online /Cleanup-Image /AnalyzeComponentStore
dism.exe /Online /Cleanup-Image /StartComponentCleanup
Windows image cleanup KB4565351

Subhan Zafar

Subhan holds a degree in Electrical Engineering and has completed several system and network certifications including Huwaei, Cisco and Microsoft certs. He mostly researches and writes about the Windows world.

2 thoughts on “KB4601382: Cumulative Update For Windows 10 20H2 And 2004

  1. Thanks for this extensive review of the KB4601382 update for Windows 10. I consider installing it. But I (still) have one question remaining though…

    The update’s full display name is “2021-02 Cumulative Update Preview for Windows 10 Version 20H2 for x64-based Systems (KB-4601382)” as your screenshot shows.

    Do you happen to know why this is a PREVIEW update? I get goosebumps when I get a “preview” update offer. As a software developer, I intensively use Visual Studio 2019. Microsoft also offers a “preview” version, which offers upcoming functionality which is actually still in a testing phase. So I tend to compare the “preview” indication with “release candidate” or “beta” indications.

    The last time I dared to install such “preview” updates was a just few weeks ago (KB4598291 and/or KB4598299), which made my Visual Studio 2019 application crash without prior warning when I tried moving around docked code windows in the IDE. Terrible. It actually confirmed my suspicions that “preview” would indeed mean “not ready for production use”.

    But perhaps I am mistaken here?

    1. Hello Bart,
      You have highlighted an excellent question. Whether we should install preview updates or not?

      Microsoft has a process of trickling down their update through the different Insider channels. The purpose of the Windows Insider Program is to mitigate all and any issues experienced by the general users through feedback BEFORE releasing it to every Windows consumer.

      Even after that, Microsoft occasionally releases preview updates to the stable channel, which we believe could be because of 2 reasons:
      – Some features included have not been tested by Insiders.
      – Microsoft wants more consumers to test out the update, as only 0.3 percent of users are active members of the insider program (Source: AdDuplex https://reports.adduplex.com/#/r/2021-02)

      A preview update is released ahead of the next monthly update, which we call Patch Tuesday, to test out and polish any features that are going to be distributed to every Windows user.

      Therefore, it can be concluded that a preview update is not entirely stable. In this case, its Servicing Stack Update (SSU) was not a part of the Insider-equivalent update (https://www.itechtics.com/kb4601382/). This is also the reason why preview updates are released as “Optional Updates.”

      To sum up, it is not a wise decision to install a preview update in a live/ production environment.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recent Posts