Download and install PowerShell 7.2 Preview 2 for Windows 10

Microsoft seems to be actively developing and improving PowerShell Core. Not long ago, Microsoft released PowerShell 7.1 in November and now we are here with a new release of PowerShell 7.2 Preview 2.

The preview 2 is still based on .NET 5, as .NET 6 is yet to be released. However, Microsoft claims that the stable version of PowerShell 7.2 will be based on .NET 6.

Let’s see what PowerShell 7.2.0 brings to the table.

Download PowerShell 7.2.0 Preview 2

For Windows 10, Windows 8.1 and Windows 7

PowerShell-7.2.0-Preview2-win-x64.msi [95.1 MB]

PowerShell-7.2.0-Preview2-win-x86.msi [85.9 MB]

For MacOS

powershell-7.2.0-Preview2-osx-x64.pkg [63.4 MB]

For Linux

CentOS

powershell-7.2.0-Preview2-1.centos.8.x86_64.rpm [64.7 MB]

Debian

powershell_7.2.0-Preview2-1.debian.11_amd64.deb [65.2 MB]

powershell_7.2.0-Preview2-1.debian.10_amd64.deb [65.2 MB]

Ubuntu

powershell_7.2.0-Preview21.ubuntu.20.04_amd64.deb [65.2 MB]

powershell_7.2.0-Preview2-1.ubuntu.18.04_amd64.deb [65.2 MB]

powershell_7.2.0-Preview2-1.ubuntu.16.04_amd64.deb [65.2 MB]

For more download options, please checkout this download page.

PowerShell 7.2.0 Preview 2 features

Thanks to Microsoft and PowerShell contributors, some significant changes have been made to the released version. Some new features and bug fixes have been highlighted in the release post by Microsoft. Let’s shed some light on what those are.

New feature

PSStyle automatic variable for ANSI rendering

This is an experimental feature. Meaning, Microsoft is currently awaiting users’ feedback to see whether or not to release this feature with the stable release of PowerShell 7.2.

The ANSI escape code is an extension of the ASCII escape code. This feature will make it easier for the users to author content containing the ANSI code, which controls the text decoration parameters, such as its font, color, size, italics, etc.

You can read more about the feature here.

Bug fixes

Some issues that accompanied the previous release of PowerShell have also been addressed with this Preview release.

  • Code Cleanup: Microsoft states that nearly two-thirds of the pull requests have been answered, resulting in a code cleanup. This refers to a piece of code dedicated to cleanup leftover data and other unneeded material from the system after the actual code has been executed.
  • An issue of the users receiving a bugcheck of “Incorrect Function” when trying to use an executable file on a drive that is not in the NTFS format has been addressed. This issue was first experienced with PowerShell 7.1 due to an issue with the reparse points, which has now been fixed.
  • PipelineVariable Common Parameter: This object now correctly contains all of the parameters passed through it, instead of containing just the first input parameter.

Here is the complete changelog:

Changed:

  • Improve detection of mutable value types
  • Ensure -PipelineVariable is set for all output from script cmdlets

New experimental Features:

  • PSAnsiRendering: Enable ANSI formatting via $PSStyle and support suppressing ANSI output

Improved performance:

  • Optimize IEnumerable variant of replace operator
  • Refactor multiply operation for better performance in two Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.Utility methods
  • Use Environment.TickCount64 instead of Datetime.Now as the random seed for AppLocker test file content
  • Avoid unnecessary array allocations when searching in GAC
  • Use OrdinalIgnoreCase in CommandLineParser
  • Use StringComparison.Ordinal instead of StringComparison.CurrentCulture 
  • Avoid creating instances of the generated delegate helper class in -replace implementation

General Cmdlet Updates and Fixes:

  • Write better error message if config file is broken
  • Make AppLocker Enforce mode take precedence over UMCI Audit mode
  • Add -SkipLimitCheck switch to Import-PowerShellDataFile
  • Restrict New-Object in NoLanguage mode under lock down
  • The -Stream parameter now works with directories
  • Avoid an exception if file system does not support reparse points
  • Enable CA1012: Abstract types should not have public constructors
  • Enable SA1212: Property accessors should follow order

You can learn more about the PowerShell 7.2 changelog from here.

How to install PowerShell 7.2 Preview 2 in Windows 10

Use the guide provided to download PowerShell 7.2 on Windows 10, 8.1, and 7.

  1. Download the respective .MSI file from the links provided above.
  2. Execute the downloaded package. In the installation wizard, click Next.
    Download and install PowerShell 7.2 Preview 2 for Windows 10 1
  3. On the next screen, choose a destination path to save the new installation and then click Next.
    Download and install PowerShell 7.2 Preview 2 for Windows 10 2
  4. Now select the optional features you wish to install by checking the boxes next to them. You can add PowerShell to the environment variables, enable PowerShell remoting, add PowerShell to the context menu, etc. Click Next when done.
    Download and install PowerShell 7.2 Preview 2 for Windows 10 3
  5. Click Install to begin the process.
    Download and install PowerShell 7.2 Preview 2 for Windows 10 4
  6. The installation should be completed in less than a minute. Click on Finish when it is. You may also check the box next to Launch PowerShell to do so before hitting Finish.
    Download and install PowerShell 7.2 Preview 2 for Windows 10 5
  7. Now verify that the installation has been completed by typing in pwsh in Run. You will then see a version of PowerShell running.
    Download and install PowerShell 7.2 Preview 2 for Windows 10 6

You may also download the latest stable release of PowerShell by running the following command in the existing PowerShell on your Windows:

iex "& { $(irm https://aka.ms/install-powershell.ps1) } -UseMSI -Quiet"
Download and install PowerShell 7.2 Preview 2 for Windows 10 7

You can also download and install PowerShell over the network. This method is best suited for sysadmins.

Closing words

PowerShell 7.2 is still in preview so you should never install it on a production system. But it is always fun to test out the new features on a dev machine. If you love automation on Windows 10 and Windows Server, you should definitely check out this new release of PowerShell.

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