Django Lifecycle: End Of Life And Support Status

Last updated on January 15, 2024

Django is a free and open-source web framework designed for high-level Python development. It offers a fast, secure, and scalable development environment so the developers can focus on their apps.

Support status guide

End of life (EOL) is the end of a product’s useful life. When a product reaches the end of its life cycle, the manufacturer no longer supports it. The following table explains the different phases of a product’s lifecycle. Testing status is when the product is initially released and EOL is when product support is no longer offered. The time between these two points is the support timeframe.

Testing

The software is not yet publicly available. It is in testing phase i.e., alpha, beta, release preview etc.

Active

The software is actively supported by the vendor.

Phasing Out

The software will soon reach its end of life. You need to look for upgrade or migration options. The software will automatically go into phasing out status 2 months before end of life.

End Of Life

The software is no longer supported by the vendor. You need to make sure your system and environment are safe.

Version

Released

Active Support

Security Support

Django 5.0
2 months and 1 week ago
(4 December 2023)
Ends in 5 months and 2 weeks
(1 August 2024)
Ends in 1 year and 1 month
(1 April 2025)
Django 4.2 (LTS)
10 months and 1 week ago
(3 April 2023)
Ended 2 months and 1 week ago
(4 December 2023)
Ends in 2 years and 1 month
(1 April 2026)
Django 4.1
1 year and 6 months ago
(3 August 2022)
Ended 10 months and 1 week ago
(1 April 2023)
Ended 2 months and 1 week ago
(1 December 2023)
Django 4.0
2 years and 2 months ago
(7 December 2021)
Ended 1 year and 6 months ago
(1 August 2022)
Ended 1 year and 1 month ago
(1 January 2023)
Django 3.2 (LTS)
2 years and 10 months ago
(6 April 2021)
Ended 2 years and 2 months ago
(1 December 2021)
Ends in 1 month and 2 weeks
(1 April 2024)
Django 3.1
3 years and 6 months ago
(4 August 2020)
Ended 2 years and 10 months ago
(5 April 2021)
Ended 2 years and 2 months ago
(7 December 2021)
Django 3.0
4 years and 2 months ago
(2 December 2019)
Ended 3 years and 6 months ago
(1 August 2020)
Ended 2 years and 10 months ago
(6 April 2021)
Django 2.2 (LTS)
4 years and 10 months ago
(1 April 2019)
Ended 4 years and 2 months ago
(1 December 2019)
Ended 1 year and 10 months ago
(1 April 2022)
Django 2.1
5 years and 6 months ago
(1 August 2018)
Ended 4 years and 10 months ago
(1 April 2019)
Ended 4 years and 2 months ago
(2 December 2019)
Django 2.0
6 years and 2 months ago
(2 December 2017)
Ended 5 years and 6 months ago
(1 August 2018)
Ended 4 years and 10 months ago
(1 April 2019)
Django 1.11 (LTS)
6 years and 10 months ago
(4 April 2017)
Ended 6 years and 2 months ago
(2 December 2017)
Ended 3 years and 10 months ago
(1 April 2020)

Each version of Django does not support all Python versions – only a few are compatible. Here is a list of compatible Python versions for each Django release:

Django Version Supported Python Versions
5.0 3.10-3.12
4.2 3.8-3.12
3.2 3.6-3.10
2.2 3.5-3.9
2.0 3.4-3.7
1.11.x 2.7, 3.4-3.7

A newer version of Django is released every 8 months. It is then actively supported for another 8 months before it enters the security support phase, which also lasts another 8 months. This means that each Django version is supported for 16 months in total.

This also means that at any given time, at least 2 Django versions will be supported by the Django Project.

Additionally, the last minor release of every major release is the Long Term Servicing (LTS) release, which means that it is supported longer than the regular releases. An LTS release receives 8 months of active support, just as any regular release, and then receives another 28 months of security support; making a total support cycle of 3 years for the LTS version.

The following table demonstrates the support lifecycle of different versions of Django:

Django support lifecycle

Note that an even minor release is also rolled out occasionally on an as-needed basis. They usually include bug fixes and sometimes address security vulnerabilities.