Kubernetes Lifecycle: End Of Life And Support Status

Last updated on January 19, 2024

Kubernetes is an open-source automation platform used for running and managing container applications from many container runtimes. It has a server-client relationship that is used by DevOps teams for container orchestration.

Support status guide

End of life (EOL) is the end of a product’s useful life. When a product reaches the end of its life cycle, the manufacturer no longer supports it. The following table explains the different phases of a product’s lifecycle. Testing status is when the product is initially released and EOL is when product support is no longer offered. The time between these two points is the support timeframe.

Testing

The software is not yet publicly available. It is in testing phase i.e., alpha, beta, release preview etc.

Active

The software is actively supported by the vendor.

Phasing Out

The software will soon reach its end of life. You need to look for upgrade or migration options. The software will automatically go into phasing out status 2 months before end of life.

End Of Life

The software is no longer supported by the vendor. You need to make sure your system and environment are safe.

Version

Released

Active Support

Maintenance Support

Kubernetes 1.29
1 month and 4 weeks ago
(13 December 2023)
Ends in 10 months and 2 weeks
(28 December 2024)
Ends in 1 year and 2 weeks
(28 February 2025)
Kubernetes 1.28
5 months and 4 weeks ago
(15 August 2023)
Ends in 6 months and 2 weeks
(28 August 2024)
Ends in 8 months and 2 weeks
(28 October 2024)
Kubernetes 1.27
10 months and 1 day ago
(11 April 2023)
Ends in 2 months and 2 weeks
(28 April 2024)
Ends in 4 months and 2 weeks
(28 June 2024)
Kubernetes 1.26
1 year and 2 months ago
(8 December 2022)
Ended 1 month and 2 weeks ago
(28 December 2023)
Ends in 2 weeks and 1 day
(28 February 2024)
Kubernetes 1.25
1 year and 5 months ago
(23 August 2022)
Ended 5 months and 2 weeks ago
(27 August 2023)
Ended 3 months and 2 weeks ago
(27 October 2023)
Kubernetes 1.24
1 year and 9 months ago
(3 May 2022)
Ended 8 months and 2 weeks ago
(28 May 2023)
Ended 6 months and 2 weeks ago
(28 July 2023)
Kubernetes 1.23
2 years and 2 months ago
(7 December 2021)
Ended 1 year and 1 month ago
(28 December 2022)
Ended 11 months and 1 week ago
(28 February 2023)
Kubernetes 1.22
2 years and 6 months ago
(4 August 2021)
Ended 1 year and 5 months ago
(28 August 2022)
Ended 1 year and 3 months ago
(28 October 2022)
Kubernetes 1.21
2 years and 10 months ago
(8 April 2021)
Ended 1 year and 9 months ago
(28 April 2022)
Ended 1 year and 7 months ago
(28 June 2022)
Kubernetes 1.20
3 years and 2 months ago
(8 December 2020)
Ended 2 years and 1 month ago
(28 December 2021)
Ended 1 year and 11 months ago
(28 February 2022)
Kubernetes 1.19
3 years and 5 months ago
(26 August 2020)
Ended 2 years and 5 months ago
(28 August 2021)
Ended 2 years and 3 months ago
(28 October 2021)
Kubernetes 1.18
3 years and 10 months ago
(25 March 2020)
Ended 2 years and 9 months ago
(28 April 2021)
Ended 2 years and 7 months ago
(18 June 2021)
Kubernetes 1.17
4 years and 2 months ago
(7 December 2019)
Not Supported
Ended 3 years and 1 month ago
(25 December 2020)
Kubernetes 1.16
4 years and 4 months ago
(18 September 2019)
Not Supported
Ended 3 years and 6 months ago
(4 August 2020)

Kubernetes follows the semantic versioning policy, which means that it has major releases, minor releases, and patch releases. Which is why it has a versioning as “Major.Minor.Patch”.

In 2020 after the pandemic hit, Kubernetes shifted to a 15-week release cycle, which meant that there will be now 3 (minor) updates per year. Before this, Kubernetes followed a release cadence of 4 releases per year. You can learn more about the Kubernetes release cadence.

Each Kubernetes version is supported for 14 months in total, out of which 2 months are the upgrade period, and receives 12 months of active support. When combined with a 25-week release cycle, it means that at a time, 3 Kubernetes versions are actively supported.

Fixes and security updates may or may not be backported to the older supported versions of Kubernetes. The decision for these patch releases lies with the Release Managers group – which refers to the Kubernetes contributors.

Due to the client-server design of Kubernetes, the supported component upgrade sequence is also determined by the supported version skew between the client and the server.