Python Lifecycle: End Of Life And Support Status

Last updated on November 10, 2023

Python is an interpreted programming language, which means that the implementations execute the instructions directly without having to compile the code into a machine-understandable language. Moreover, it is also an object-oriented language, which means that it is based on attributes.

Python is a high-level programming language used for multiple purposes, which is why a Python developer can create different types of programs. With its easy-to-understand and brief syntax, it allows the developers to write complex programs in a limited number of lines.

Support status guide

End of life (EOL) is the end of a product’s useful life. When a product reaches the end of its life cycle, the manufacturer no longer supports it. The following table explains the different phases of a product’s lifecycle. Testing status is when the product is initially released and EOL is when product support is no longer offered. The time between these two points is the support timeframe.

Testing

The software is not yet publicly available. It is in testing phase i.e., alpha, beta, release preview etc.

Active

The software is actively supported by the vendor.

Phasing Out

The software will soon reach its end of life. You need to look for upgrade or migration options. The software will automatically go into phasing out status 2 months before end of life.

End Of Life

The software is no longer supported by the vendor. You need to make sure your system and environment are safe.

Version

Released

Active Support

Security Support

Python 3.13
In 4 months and 1 week
(1 October 2024)
Ends in 2 years and 4 months
(15 October 2026)
Ends in 5 years and 4 months
(10 October 2029)
Python 3.12
7 months and 2 weeks ago
(2 October 2023)
Ends in 10 months and 2 weeks
(2 April 2025)
Ends in 4 years and 4 months
(2 October 2028)
Python 3.11
1 year and 6 months ago
(24 October 2022)
Ended 1 month and 2 weeks ago
(1 April 2024)
Ends in 3 years and 5 months
(24 October 2027)
Python 3.10
2 years and 7 months ago
(4 October 2021)
Ended 1 year and 1 month ago
(5 April 2023)
Ends in 2 years and 4 months
(4 October 2026)
Python 3.9
3 years and 7 months ago
(5 October 2020)
Ended 2 years and 1 day ago
(17 May 2022)
Ends in 1 year and 4 months
(5 October 2025)
Python 3.8
4 years and 7 months ago
(14 October 2019)
Ended 3 years and 2 weeks ago
(3 May 2021)
Ends in 4 months and 3 weeks
(14 October 2024)
Python 3.7
5 years and 10 months ago
(26 June 2018)
Ended 3 years and 10 months ago
(27 June 2020)
Ended 10 months and 3 weeks ago
(27 June 2023)
Python 3.6
7 years and 4 months ago
(22 December 2016)
Ended 5 years and 4 months ago
(24 December 2018)
Ended 2 years and 4 months ago
(23 December 2021)
Python 3.5
8 years and 8 months ago
(12 September 2015)
Not Supported
Ended 3 years and 8 months ago
(13 September 2020)
Python 3.4
10 years and 2 months ago
(15 March 2014)
Not Supported
Ended 5 years and 2 months ago
(18 March 2019)
Python 3.3
11 years and 7 months ago
(29 September 2012)
Not Supported
Ended 6 years and 7 months ago
(29 September 2017)
Python 2.7
13 years and 10 months ago
(3 July 2010)
Not Supported
Ended 4 years and 4 months ago
(1 January 2020)
Python 2.6
15 years and 7 months ago
(1 October 2008)
Not Supported
Ended 10 years and 7 months ago
(9 October 2013)

After 2018, with the release of Python version 3.7, a newer version is released every year.  It is then supported for a total of 5 years from the release date, which is divided into Active Support and Security support.

Active Support is offered for 1.5 years, during which the Python version receives security updates as well as bug fixes. In the remaining 3.5 years, the Python version is in the Security Support phase, where they only receive security patches.

Starting with Python version 3.13, each version will receive 2 years of Active Support and 3 years of Security Support. This information can be confirmed by the official Python Enhancement Proposals (PEPs).

You can find accurate information about the upcoming releases and which Python version is receiving which kind of support on the Python status webpage.