Oracle JDK Service Lifecycle (End of Life)

Last updated on April 18, 2024

The Java Development Kit (JDK) is a software development environment meant for developers, for developing applications in Java. It includes both the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) and the Java Virtual Machine (JVM).

JDK can be downloaded and installed on multiple platforms including Windows, Linux, and macOS, which is why the developers can create complex applications in Java for all of these platforms.

Oracle JDK is a closed-source software that now requires a license for commercial use. In 2017, Oracle announced free Java licensing. However, in 2023, they reiterated their pricing models and may now incur a cost to the commercial users of JDK.

Support status guide

End of life (EOL) is the end of a product’s useful life. When a product reaches the end of its life cycle, the manufacturer no longer supports it. The following table explains the different phases of a product’s lifecycle. Testing status is when the product is initially released and EOL is when product support is no longer offered. The time between these two points is the support timeframe.

Testing

The software is not yet publicly available. It is in testing phase i.e., alpha, beta, release preview etc.

Active

The software is actively supported by the vendor.

Phasing Out

The software will soon reach its end of life. You need to look for upgrade or migration options. The software will automatically go into phasing out status 2 months before end of life.

End Of Life

The software is no longer supported by the vendor. You need to make sure your system and environment are safe.

Version

Released

Active Support

Extended Support

JDK 22
2 months and 1 week ago
(19 March 2024)
Ends in 3 months and 2 weeks
(17 September 2024)
Not Supported
JDK 21 (LTS)
8 months and 1 week ago
(19 September 2023)
Ends in 4 years and 4 months
(30 September 2028)
Ends in 7 years and 4 months
(30 September 2031)
JDK 20
1 year and 2 months ago
(21 March 2023)
Ended 8 months and 1 week ago
(19 September 2023)
Not Supported
JDK 19
1 year and 8 months ago
(20 September 2022)
Ended 1 year and 2 months ago
(21 March 2023)
Not Supported
JDK 18
2 years and 2 months ago
(22 March 2022)
Ended 1 year and 8 months ago
(20 September 2022)
Not Supported
JDK 17 (LTS)
2 years and 8 months ago
(14 September 2021)
Ends in 2 years and 4 months
(30 September 2026)
Ends in 5 years and 4 months
(30 September 2029)
JDK 16
3 years and 2 months ago
(16 March 2021)
Ended 2 years and 8 months ago
(14 September 2021)
Not Supported
JDK 15
3 years and 8 months ago
(15 September 2020)
Ended 3 years and 2 months ago
(16 March 2021)
Not Supported
JDK 14
4 years and 2 months ago
(17 March 2020)
Ended 3 years and 8 months ago
(16 September 2020)
Not Supported
JDK 13
4 years and 8 months ago
(17 September 2019)
Ended 4 years and 2 months ago
(17 March 2020)
Not Supported
JDK 12
5 years and 2 months ago
(19 March 2019)
Ended 4 years and 8 months ago
(17 September 2019)
Not Supported
JDK 11 (LTS)
5 years and 8 months ago
(25 September 2018)
Ended 7 months and 3 weeks ago
(30 September 2023)
Ends in 7 years and 8 months
(31 January 2032)
JDK 10
6 years and 2 months ago
(20 March 2018)
Ended 5 years and 8 months ago
(25 September 2018)
Not Supported
JDK 9
6 years and 8 months ago
(21 September 2017)
Ended 6 years and 2 months ago
(20 March 2018)
Not Supported
JDK 8 (LTS)
10 years and 2 months ago
(18 March 2014)
Ended 2 years and 1 month ago
(31 March 2022)
Ends in 6 years and 7 months
(31 December 2030)
JDK 7 (LTS)
12 years and 10 months ago
(11 July 2011)
Ended 4 years and 9 months ago
(31 July 2019)
Ended 1 year and 10 months ago
(19 July 2022)
JDK 6
17 years and 5 months ago
(12 December 2006)
Ended 5 years and 4 months ago
(31 December 2018)
Not Supported
JDK 5
19 years and 7 months ago
(30 September 2004)
Ended 14 years and 6 months ago
(30 October 2009)
Not Supported
JDK 1.4
22 years and 3 months ago
(13 February 2002)
Ended 15 years and 6 months ago
(30 October 2008)
Not Supported
JDK 1.3
24 years and 2 weeks ago
(8 May 2000)
Ended 18 years and 1 month ago
(31 March 2006)
Not Supported
JDK 1.2
25 years and 5 months ago
(4 December 1998)
Ended 20 years and 5 months ago
(30 November 2003)
Not Supported
JDK 1.1
27 years and 3 months ago
(18 February 1997)
Ended 21 years and 7 months ago
(9 October 2002)
Not Supported
JDK 1.0
28 years and 4 months ago
(23 January 1996)
Ended 28 years and 2 weeks ago
(7 May 1996)
Not Supported

The Oracle JDK follows a 6-month rapid-release release cycle. This means that every 6 months, a newer major version of JDK is published. Since it is released so often, the active support, or the “Premier support” for each version lasts only 6 months as well, unless it is a Long Term Servicing (LTS) release. No other support is offered for these regular releases.

Before Oracle JDK 17, the LTS releases had no specific schedule. Now, Oracle follows a schedule of 2-yearly LTS release. That said, LTS releases have a Premier support duration of 5 years, an additional 3 years of extended support, and then an indefinite period of “Sustaining support” in which Oracle provides assistance, but no bug or security fixes.

Here are the brief details of what each type of support offers:

  • Premier support: Includes bug and security fixes, as well as minor improvements. 6 months for regular releases, 5 years for LTS releases.
  • Extended support: Applies only to the LTS releases, for 3 years after the expiration of the Premier support. It includes bug and security fixes, as well as minor improvements.
  • Sustaining support: This applies to the LTS releases for an indefinite time. Users only receive assistance from Oracle; no bug or security fixes are offered.